Guardian Top Stories

Bike Park Costs Mount?

This came in from a GUARDIAN reader today on the bike park near Ft. Boise…

Was I the only person in Council chambers during the Bike Skills Park “hearing” who heard Parks Director Doug Holloway, in response to concerns about hidden costs of a “public” park being developed for an Albertson Foundation Board member who lives in the East End, say that there would be no additional staff hired? “We can cover it with existing staff.”

So how does the Mr. Holloway, the Mayor, and City Council explain this JOB POST on the City’s web site?

Retired California Developer On Impact Fees

GUEST OPINION
By Dick Evons
Retired California Developer

Growth and the resulting problems it causes are a top priority for many voters in the approaching city elections.

I haven’t heard any candidates offering to slow the growth or protect those who already live here.
 
Boise and Idaho have been discovered, and are drawing multitudes–just the beginning of the WonderRush, (a personal and family Joy for the senses, more precious and fulfilling than silver or gold).
 
Financing its preservation must be perpetual by assuring that the “price of admission” to our way of life is addressed, well thought out, and fair.
 
Essentials include;  Proper Development Fees that fully cover all expenses created by the new residential and commercial building. 

The impact fees to provide  for the required infrastructure such as  roadways, water, sewer, utilities, schools, libraries, parks and proper administration are steps to be required before building permits are granted.  The process must include; effective Traffic engineering, and soil seports, as examples of what we have seen going wrong when not properly addressed.
 
The last California development project I was involved with, assessed Fees of $50,000.00 per unit for a mixed- use development which included residential and commercial.
 
Here in Boise, I found that similar impact fees were a mere $200 per unit, thus creating an incentive to overbuild and shift costs from the developer to the citizen taxpayer. 

The results are showcased in recent headlines, quoting current homeowners’ concerns of not being able to remain in homes, they lived in for decades, due to the increased property taxes. Realistic impact fees would certainly serve to slow the growth.
 
If you  are tired of the traffic congestion, lack of  schools, parks, libraries, due to rampant growth, demand explanations from those seeking your vote for Mayor of Boise.
 

Municipal Election Reference List

There has been some pretty extensive reporting by the local media on the Boise election process.

The BOISE WORKING TOGETHER group offers up results of their candidate survey at the linked site.

IDAHO STATESMAN has been running candidate profiles on the top four candidates for mayor. Click within the site for each candidate.

Tune in Friday 4pm for a candidate forum on KBOI TV and AM670 Radio.

BOISEDEV has also spent quite an effort on candidate PROFILES.

IDAHOPRESS detailed the Boise MAYOR FORUM held Thursday night at the Hillcrest Library.

Campaign finance reports filed Thursday show a surprising range of contributions. (search the city clerk site for ELECTION DOCUMENTS. We were unable to provide a viable link)

In the race for mayor, Lauren McLean showed $216,263. She also had $49,589 in her previous account for council seat 1. Brent Coles showed $4695 and Rebecca Arnold with $31,970. Incumbent Dave Bieter tallied $284,557.

Brittney Scigliano collected $25,383 in the Seat 1 race while Patrick Bageant gathered just over $30,000.

Most impressive to the GUARDIAN were totals in the seat 5 race with $22,640 in contributions to Debbie Lombard-Bloom vs Elaine Clegg’s $13,985. Even with a $7804 beginning balance, Clegg had $21,789–still under the new comer Lombard-Bloom’s total.

Jimmy Hallyburton garnered $21826 for seat 3 while his opponent, Merideth Stead received $29,130.

Public TV Story Misleads On Coles

A recent Idaho Public Television on-line POST by reporter Seth Ogilvie seems to make it appear that former Boise Mayor Brent Coles was not eligible to run for office due to a plea bargain 16 years ago.

However, in about the 20th paragraph of the story, Ogilvie quotes several attorneys who explain the original agreement was unenforceable and the judge exceeded his authority.

EXCERPT:
“The Court cannot enforce a condition beyond the time that it has jurisdiction,” said Tara Malek, owner of the Idaho law firm Smith + Malek. “Here, the court retained jurisdiction over Mr. Cole for three years.”

“Indefinitely and permanently” is longer than three years.

“As a result of completing the terms,” said Idaho’s former U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson, “my view is that the condition of not running for office is no longer binding, if it ever was.”

The GUARDIAN agrees with the lawyers and notes the misdemeanor conviction and probation debt have long since been “repaid to society.” Coles is among six candidates challenging incumbent Mayor Dave Bieter in the Nov. 5 election.

Reader Comments On Bieter Statements

EDITOR NOTE–The GUARDIAN has a policy of not endorsing any candidates. We will gladly post comments from both sides of issues as well as candidates. We require real identity, not screen names.

By STEVE HULME

With the city election less than a month away, it seems likely that Career Politician Dave Bieter will maintain the helm, barring a last-minute collusion or quid-pro-quo scandal. He’s got Mucho Dinero, and he’s running against a couple other career politicians with spotty backgrounds, a college student, a sunglasses distributor, and an auto mechanic who wants to build a wall to keep the Californians out. (Not a bad idea, actually…)

On my occasional visits to Social Media Land, Mayor Bieter has been prominent as of late. According to him (or whoever on Team Dave does the social media), “I certainly cannot take all the credit, but we’ve made tremendous improvements in our quality of life in Boise since I took office.” [stated time after time, on Facebook]

You fellow old-timers who were here before 2004… do you agree that your quality of life is “tremendously improved” since then?

More specifically, he claims, “we’re cleaner, safer, kinder, and more prosperous than we’ve ever been.” [September 18]

Thanks, Dave, for putting an end to weather inversions and wildland fires! Thanks, Dave, for reducing assaults and murders! Thanks, Dave, for making everybody so nice! And thanks, Dave, for that big bump in our paychecks!

Reelect him, and here’s what you can expect: “Together, we’re going to end family homelessness, combat climate change locally, reduce single occupancy car trips by 10%, work with business leaders to reduce waste, continue to ensure Boise is a welcoming city to everyone through Boise Kind, increase affordable housing through Grow Our Housing, and improve our transpiration [SIC] system through Keep Boise Moving. [September 19]

And – that’s all small potatoes, compared with his pie-in-the-sky dream projects: a city-owned sports stadium, a new $100 million palatial library, and a $100 million streetcar.
Isn’t it amazing what you can do, when you have a continuous flow of other peoples’ money?!!

Here are a couple noodle-scratchers:

“When I first ran for mayor, I promised to be transparent and accessible to the people of Boise.” [September 14]

How has that promise worked out?

“Housing affordability is an issue that we must tackle as a community, together.” [September 12]

That seems a little disingenuous, from a city administration that always wrings every property-tax dollar from residents. Is he concerned about working-class folks and senior citizens who could very well be forced out of their homes by soaring property tax bills?

I sure wish we could find a qualified manager who wants to stretch every taxpayer dollar, and who values function over form.

If we’ve settled into Bieter as mayor-for-life, I propose we all chip in to buy him a tuxedo and top hat, like the Monopoly mayor.

The Boise Guardian

…is a fun, factual, informed and opinionated look at current news and events in and around Boise, Idaho. The Guardian was born of necessity.

Get the Guardian by email

Enter your email address:

Categories